UN General Assembly Adopts Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948)

Drafted by a committee chaired by Eleanor Roosevelt, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is the world’s most translated document. Among its 30 articles are definitions of civil and political rights, as well as definitions of economic, social, and cultural rights—all of which are owed by UN member states to those under their jurisdiction. Since its adoption, it has acquired more juridical status than originally intended and has been widely used, even by national courts, in what ways?
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Subvertising

Subvertising is the practice of making spoofs or parodies of corporate and political advertisements. Taking its name from a combination of the words “subvert” and “advertising,” the act is often intended to sabotage its targets by presenting easily recognizable images that are shocking upon second glance. Still, some critics say subverts, which are often modified versions of existing images, merely increase public awareness of the original symbols.

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Intellectual Property

Intellectual property is an umbrella term for the various legal entitlements associated with certain names, literary works, recorded media, and inventions. The holders of such entitlements may exercise various exclusive rights in relation to the use of their intellectual property. The concept is controversial because it implies that intellectual works—so-called products of the mind—are analogous to physical property.

What is the difference between a copyright, a trademark, and a patent? Discuss
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The man on the Clapham omnibus – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The man on the Clapham omnibus is a hypothetical reasonable person, used by the courts in English law where it is necessary to decide whether a party has acted as a reasonable person would – for example, in a civil action for negligence. The man on the Clapham omnibus is a reasonably educated and intelligent but nondescript person, against whom the defendant’s conduct can be measured.

Source: The man on the Clapham omnibus – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia