“Selling Airplanes”

On Aug. 7, 1955, Boeing’s chief of flight testing, the legendary Alvin “Tex” Johnston, pulled an impressive stunt in the prototype of the Boeing 707.

Johnston didn’t just do a flyover. No. At a speed of 490 miles an hour, Johnston executed a barrel roll.

The stunt, called a Barrel Roll, was performed in front of a crowd of 250,000 spectators attending the Gold Cup hydro races which included many airline executives from around the world (who were in Seattle for an annual meeting) in attendance.

When asked what he thought he thought he was doing Johnston answered, “Selling Airplanes”.

Read More: http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/60-years-ago-the-famous-boeing-707-barrel-roll-over-lake-washington/

www.Boeing.com

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing

 

 

 

Kilroy Was Here

“Kilroy was here” is an American popular culture expression that is believed to have originated during World War II, when a US shipyard worker began scrawling the phrase on ships he had inspected. US servicemen then took up the saying and began scrawling it all over the world, wherever they were stationed or encamped. The phrase is usually paired with a doodle of a man peeking over a wall, a cartoon that was likely adopted from UK wartime graffiti that was often accompanied by what slogans? Discuss
…read more

Kilroy Was Here photo
Photo by Writeropolis

 

I’m Your Huckleberry

19th century slang which was popularized more recently by the movie Tombstone. Means “I’m the man you’re looking for”.
Nowadays it’s usually used as a response to a threat or challenge, as in the movie.
“Who thinks they can beat me?”
“I’m your huckleberry.”