scathing

scathing – (adjective) – Bitterly denunciatory; harshly critical.
Synonyms: vituperative.

Usage: This scathing remark caused the Prince to hide his face for shame, and Steve to erect his head in the proud consciousness that this shot was not meant for him.

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Feraliminal Lycanthropizer

The Feraliminal Lycanthropizer is a fictional machine invented by American writer David Woodard, whose 1990 pamphlet of the same title speculates on its history and purpose.

The brief, anonymously published work describes a vibration referred to as thanato-auric waves, which the machine electrically generates by combining three infrasonic sine waves (3 Hz, 9 Hz and 0.56 Hz) with concomitant tape loops of unspecified spoken text (two beyond the threshold of decipherability, and two beneath the threshold).

See also https://www.quora.com/q/weirdwiki/Feraliminal-Lycanthropizer-Wikipedia?__filter__=all&__nsrc__=1&__snid3__=4044130613

read more at Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“Selling Airplanes”

On Aug. 7, 1955, Boeing’s chief of flight testing, the legendary Alvin “Tex” Johnston, pulled an impressive stunt in the prototype of the Boeing 707.

Johnston didn’t just do a flyover. No. At a speed of 490 miles an hour, Johnston executed a barrel roll.

The stunt, called a Barrel Roll, was performed in front of a crowd of 250,000 spectators attending the Gold Cup hydro races which included many airline executives from around the world (who were in Seattle for an annual meeting) in attendance.

When asked what he thought he thought he was doing Johnston answered, “Selling Airplanes”.

Read More: http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/60-years-ago-the-famous-boeing-707-barrel-roll-over-lake-washington/

www.Boeing.com

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing

 

 

 

Subvertising

Subvertising is the practice of making spoofs or parodies of corporate and political advertisements. Taking its name from a combination of the words “subvert” and “advertising,” the act is often intended to sabotage its targets by presenting easily recognizable images that are shocking upon second glance. Still, some critics say subverts, which are often modified versions of existing images, merely increase public awareness of the original symbols.

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Age is Just a Number

Jeanne Louise Calment, who died at 122 years and 164 days of age, lived to be the oldest person on record. Though her parents and siblings also lived to an advanced age, she outlived them all. An active woman, Calment continued to ride a bicycle until she was 100 years old and lived independently until she was nearly 110. At 114, she became the world’s oldest actress, appearing as herself in the family film Vincent and Me. Calment attributed her longevity to what food product? Discuss
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Kilroy Was Here

“Kilroy was here” is an American popular culture expression that is believed to have originated during World War II, when a US shipyard worker began scrawling the phrase on ships he had inspected. US servicemen then took up the saying and began scrawling it all over the world, wherever they were stationed or encamped. The phrase is usually paired with a doodle of a man peeking over a wall, a cartoon that was likely adopted from UK wartime graffiti that was often accompanied by what slogans? Discuss
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Kilroy Was Here photo
Photo by Writeropolis

 

“It’ll be alright!”

“It’ll be alright!”

This was an old catch phrase I used to reassure people that what appeared to be a big mess was actually not anything to sweat in my book.

It usually worked well!

 

 

Adoxography

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Adoxography is a term coined in the late 19th century, and means “fine writing on a trivial or base subject”. It was a form of rhetorical exercise “in which the legitimate methods of the encomium are applied to persons or objects in themselves obviously unworthy of praise, as being trivial, ugly, useless, ridiculous, dangerous or vicious”

Source: Adoxography – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“RTFM”

RTFM is an acronym for “Read The F***ing Manual”. RTFM is used in response to a question from a newbie that may be deemed unnecessary or redundant, had that individual done some basic research on the subject beforehand.

The antithesis of RTFM is TL;DR, which stands for “too long; didn’t read.”

 

http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/rtfm

Liberosis

liberosis n.

the desire to care less about things—to loosen your grip on your life, to stop glancing behind you every few steps, afraid that someone will snatch it …

I’m Your Huckleberry

19th century slang which was popularized more recently by the movie Tombstone. Means “I’m the man you’re looking for”.
Nowadays it’s usually used as a response to a threat or challenge, as in the movie.
“Who thinks they can beat me?”
“I’m your huckleberry.”

“I Accidentally…”

“I Accidentally…” is a catchphrase, internet slang, and trolling mechanism meant to exploit the imagination of English-speaking internet users. It is used by constructing a complete sentence that begins with “I accidentally” and removing the verb, leaving readers wondering what had been there in the first place.

http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/i-accidentally

http://www.fark.com/comments/6108474/Photoshop-theme-I-accidentally-whole-thing

Raymond Kertezc

Raymond Kertezc – Fictional Character

Raymond Kertezc is a fictional Poet included in the Minnesota_Multiphasic_Personality_Inventory assessment, survey or test as a control question to help determine if the respondent is actually paying attention to the test questions.

There are many articles and a few blogs either about our esteemed poet, his purpose, or even some blogs and poetry attributed to Mr. Kertezc.

I’d suggest the diligent student might wish to search Google for the latest ‘sightings’, references, and poetry attributed to Raymond Kertezc Google Search for Raymond Kertezc

Further Reading:

http://abuse.wikia.com/wiki/Raymond_Kertezc

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia%3AArticles_for_deletion%2FRaymond_kertezc

 

“Lurk Moar”

(Intentionally misspelled)

Lurk Moar is a phrase used by image board and forums posters alike to inform other users they need to post less and study the community before posting again. The phrase can generally be used as a euphemism in a derogatory sense so as to inform users they are not wanted/welcomed, but may also be intended as legitimate advice for new users.

http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/lurk-moar